First Successful Red-breasted Goose Satellite Tracking

In February 2012 three Red-breasted Geese were released in the frame of Bulgaria-U.S. Red-breasted Goose Project after being successfully fitted for the first time with satellite transmitters to follow their movements on the wintering grounds and migration north to the breeding grounds.

They joined a large flock of Red-breasted Geese foraging near the northern Black Sea coast of Bulgaria. Birds are named Mini, Teddy and Boris. Mini was fitted with a 22 g Solar Argos/GPS satellite transmitter ID # 105 756 and a colour ring red with white numbers (01) on the right leg. Teddy (adult male) was fitted with a 30g Solar Argos/GPS satellite transmitter ID # 105 757, plastic red ring with white numbering inscription 02 on the right leg and metal ring on the left leg. Boris (young male) was fitted with a 30 g Solar Argos/GPS satellite PTT (platform transmitter terminal) ID # 105 758, plastic red ring with white numbering inscription 03 on the right leg and metal ring on the left leg. The transmitters are programmed to upload data to the satellite every two days so we have to practice patience in the interest of satellite expenses.

For the moment Teddy is giving excellent quality locations up through today providing us with a lot of information about the use of feeding grounds, beginning of migration, stop-over places and migration route between Europe and Asia.


Hope is that the birds will reveal unknown sites along the migration route of this most threatened goose species in the World. In the recent years the species has suffered dramatic population decline and despite efforts there is not enough information on current wintering grounds and population distribution.

Next year, USFWS, Le Balkan and Branta-Tours will deploy several Argos/GPS satellite transmitters to continue following the Red-breasted Geese movements on their wintering grounds and migration north to the breeding sites in the Arctic Tundra.

For more information please visit our RBG website: www.redbreastedgoose.org